Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.lnec.pt:8080/jspui/handle/123456789/1013256
Title: Repair, rehabilitation and retrofitting of concrete dams with cement based materials
Authors: Silva, J.
Keywords: Concrete dams;Dam rehabilitation;Dam repair;Dam retrofitting;Case histories
Issue Date: Oct-2020
Publisher: Aqua~Media International Ltd
Abstract: The use of cement based mortar and concrete for repair, rehabilitation and retrofitting of concrete dams is a relatively common practice, due to both technical and economic reasons. This paper aims at compiling some of the most relevant information concerning this topic, including references to successful case histories. Firstly, mortar or concrete patches, whose objective is typically to fix the problem with a relatively small volume of repair material. This technique is a popular solution solution for damaged surfaces due to abrasive actions. The following procedures are the concrete overlays, which typically involve more material and complexity than a patch. Finally, the cross sections thickenings, which necessarily imply a large volume of repair concrete. Different types of overlays and cross section enlargements are shown. The shotcrete technique is briefly described as an overlay technique. Conventional concrete casting is referred here as either an overlay technique or a method for increasing the cross section of a concrete dam. The common need of carrying out rehabilitation measures on the upstream face without drawing down the reservoir is considered in the subchapter underwater works. Finally, the roller compacted concrete, which is, probably, the most frequently used method for increasing the dam section. Some of these techniques are typically combined during as part of rehabilitation or retrofitting processes.
URI: http://repositorio.lnec.pt:8080/jspui/handle/123456789/1013256
Appears in Collections:DBB/NO - Comunicações a congressos e artigos de revista

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